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502-890-3921

Do You Have Hearing Loss?

Do You Need a Hearing Test?

Take the HearCare 5-Minute hearing survey to help you determine if you need your hearing tested by a health professional.

Answer Yes or No.

  1. Do you sometimes feel embarrassed when you meet new people because you struggle to hear?
  2. Do you feel frustrated when talking to members of your family because you have difficulty hearing them?
  3. Do you have difficulty hearing or understanding co-workers, clients, or customers?
  4. Do you feel restricted or limited by a hearing problem?
  5. Do you have difficulty hearing when visiting friends, relatives, or neighbors?
  6. Do you have trouble hearing in the movies or in the theater?
  7. Does a hearing problem cause you to argue with family members?
  8. Do you have trouble hearing the TV or radio at levels that are loud enough for others?
  9. Do you feel that any difficulty with your hearing limits your personal or social life?
  10. Do you have trouble hearing family or friends when you are together in a restaurant?

If you answered Yes to three or more of these questions, contact us at 502-890-3921 to schedule a complete hearing evaluation.


Adapted from: Newman, C.W., Weinstein, B.E., Jacobson, G.P., & Hug, G.A. (1990). The Hearing Handicap Inventory for Adults [HHIA]: Psychometric Adequacy and Audiometric Correlates. Ear Hear, 11, 430-433.
The HHIA test was modified for use with adults ages 18 to 64 from the original Hearing Handicap Inventory for the Elderly [HHIE], designed for use in adults aged 65 years and older. This test has been validated for consistency, test-retest reliability, and construct validity.

Types of Hearing Loss:

Sensorineural Hearing Loss

Sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) occurs when there is damage to the inner ear (cochlea), or to the nerve pathways from the inner ear to the brain. Most of the time, SNHL cannot be medically or surgically corrected. This is the most common type of permanent hearing loss.

SNHL reduces the ability to hear faint sounds. Even when speech is loud enough to hear, it may still be unclear or sound muffled.

Some possible causes of SNHL:

  • Illnesses
  • Drugs that are toxic to hearing
  • Hearing loss that runs in the family (genetic or hereditary)
  • Aging
  • Head trauma
  • Malformation of the inner ear
  • Exposure to loud noise

Conductive Hearing Loss

Conductive hearing loss occurs when sound is not conducted efficiently through the outer ear canal to the eardrum and the tiny bones (ossicles) of the middle ear.

Conductive hearing loss usually involves a reduction in sound level or the ability to hear faint sounds. This type of hearing loss can often be corrected medically or surgically.

Some possible causes of conductive hearing loss:

  • Fluid in the middle ear from colds
  • Ear infection (otitis media)
  • Allergies
  • Poor eustachian tube formation
  • Benign tumors
  • Impacted earwax (cerumen)
  • Infection in the ear canal (external otitis)
  • Swimmer's ear (otitis ecxterna)
  • Presence of a foreign body
  • Absence or malformation of the outer ear, ear canal, or middle ear

Mixed Type Hearing Loss

Sometimes a conductive hearing loss occurs in combination with a sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL). In other words, there may be damage in the outer or middle ear and in the inner ear (cochlea) or auditory nerve. When this occurs, the hearing loss is referred to as a mixed hearing loss.